Tashkent Restaurants Guide


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In the mood to dine out? Not sure what you want? Looking for casual or fine dining? Working on a budget? Check here to decide where to go. Within our pages you can find information about restaurants and some tips to know about Uzbek restaurants (No menus available yet, sorry.) It's always best to ask an experienced expert about the current status of restaurants. Regulations, currency changes, and ownership shifts can affect the quality of food and prices at the drop of a som.

Uzbeks have never developed a restaurant-going tradition in the Western sense; in restaurants they mostly tend to go "out on the town" only for special occasions, with the result that many restaurants are geared for elaborate banquets and floor shows rather than decent service and tastefully prepared dishes. The restaurants wife flashy floor shows which cater to foreigners, and local businessmen often cost $50- 100/person if pricey alcohol is included. A more normal price at a "good" restaurant, including soft drinks and alcohol, is $15-30.

 

The standard fare in Uzbek restaurants (which varies remarkably little) begins with a table full of appetizers. These include some items alien to the American palate: horsemeat, various cuts of tongue, smoked fish, and what passes for caviar, in addition to slices of cheese, potato salad, and some reasonably spicy Korean vegetable dishes, plus fruit of the season. Soups include: Logman (mutton, vegetables and long noodles), Mumpar (pasta squares instead of noodles), Shurpa (potatoes substituted), and Borsch (cabbage soup). The main dishes are usually limited to: shashlik, stroganoff, baked chicken. Chicken Kiev, broiled cutlet, breaded and fried cutlet, and monti (dumplings). Uzbek places will inevitably serve plov. Tea and coffee are served at the end. Alcohol is expensive, but most places allow you to bring your own. Korean and Pakistani restaurants serve traditional meals. Recently some very pricey ($50 a person) restaurants have opened up, providing world-class food.

Food and tun is improving daily in Tashkent with new places opening all the time. It is not always easy to satisfy all tastes and budgets especially when resources are so limited. Please keep in mind that the venues mentioned in this chapter have not ALL been tried and tested by the ex-pat community. The continual changes in the country also make it difficult for the longevity of good restaurants. Just when you find a good one, it might close.


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